Tag Archives: Fujifilm X100s

What Will I Photograph in 2016?

Vstrom Lake Casitas-3227_HDR

My Suzuki Vstrom 650 at Lake Casitas. Fujifilm X100s. I resolve to take more photo breaks on my rides.

Good question. My job at the Orfalea Foundation ends this year, so I’ll start 2016 by ramping up my freelance business: Dizzy One Ventures. I’m already shooting events for one client and writing newsletters for another. If I can add three more of each, I can postpone looking for another job indefinitely.

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Backyard birding is a great joy, but I resolve to practice better shot discipline. Nikon D7100; Nikon 70-200 f/2.8; Nikon TC17eII.

But I’ll still need to shoot for myself. I suspect I’ll make lots of bird and motorcycle images, but I’d also like to do more portraiture, which I miss dearly, and I want to shoot on location.

I’m working on a lighting kit I could carry on the motorcycle, which is no small task, since my current lighting bag doesn’t fit in the trunk of my car.

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My son on a recent sojourn to Zzyzx Road (and, in this image, Peggy Sue’s Diner). I have mixed emotions about the Fujifilm X100s these days, but I’m forcing myself to use it as my travel camera. I prefer my Nikons, but the X100s is mighty easy to carry around.

I also want to document more family events, but shoot them as well as I would for a client. Last week I put the X100s on “drunk mode” (fully automatic) and made a lot of awful photos with inadequate depth of field. It’s pretty dispiriting when the only professional photographer in the family gets the worst images of a holiday party.

I’ve been using the D610 for all of my work-for-hire shooting, but I want to integrate it more into my personal work as well. This month I’ve shot precisely zero personal images with it, which is a shame, because the image quality is excellent.

Historically, I’ve struggled to keep photography joyful when I am also doing it professionally. Best. Struggle. Ever. Looking forward to it in 2016.

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Working from home should let me photograph my neighbors during better lit times of day. Nikon D7100; Nikon 70-200 f/2.8; Nikon TC17eII.

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I had never seen a kingfisher in the neighborhood before today. This one was in a tree two houses away, which reminds me that I will probably try once again to get a more serious birding lens in 2016. We’ll see. Nikon D7100; Nikon 70-200 f/2.8; Nikon TC17eII.

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Just Like Starting Over

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Nikon D7100, 70-200 f/2.8, TC17eII

As I mentioned in the last post, I’m working with new software (Lightroom) and a new camera (Nikon D7100). Yesterday it occurred to me that I’m really working with three new cameras, because I’ve only had the Fujifilm X100s for slightly over a year, and the Nikon D610 for less than a year. I have not learned how to operate any of these cameras as comprehensively as I did my old Nikon D300, but I look forward to digging deeper.

Since the D7100 is newest and purpose-purchased for wildlife, I’ve taken it to Bolsa Chica Ecological Preserve to learn how it works, and here is the main thing I have discovered: I need to start using a tripod or monopod, because 24 megapixels exaggerates my lack of steadiness when using the equivalent of a 510mm lens (200mm + 1.7x teleconverter on 1.5x cropped sensor = 510mm). I’ve gotten some sharp images, but a pretty low keeper rate so far. I’m not sure if I’m mis-focusing or shaking, but I’m working on it.

A Reddish Egret at Bolsa Chica. Also a very small part of the frame, because even 510mm equivalent is no replacement for actual proximity.

A Reddish Egret at Bolsa Chica. Also a very small part of the frame, because even 510mm equivalent is no replacement for actual proximity. This is when 24 megapixels really helps me.

Nikon D7100, 70-200 f/2.8, TC17eII.

Nikon D7100, 70-200 f/2.8, TC17eII.

Nikon D7100, 70-200 f/2.8, TC17eII.

Nikon D7100, 70-200 f/2.8, TC17eII.

High resolution really helps when I cannot get close.

High resolution really helps when I cannot get close.

Here is the full frame from which the above image was cropped.

Here is the full frame from which the above image was cropped.

Usually I fret that I have too much gear, but yesterday I had the opportunity to use all three cameras. I took a long walk with the FujiFilm X100s and got a couple of grab shots, used the D7100 for some backyard colors, and brought out the D610 when my son wanted a picture under a very complex lighting scenario.

I had set the X100s to full auto as a walk-around camera. When I stopped for a beer, I liked this scene and simply pressed the button. No muss, no fuss.

I had set the X100s to full auto as a walk-around camera. When I stopped for a beer, I liked this scene and simply pressed the button. No muss, no fuss. And yes, the X100s has been used more in bars than any other location. Since I haven’t been going out much, the X100s has gotten little use in recent months.

Here's the sort of serendipitous scene that reminds me to carry a camera. I fired the X100s from the hip while walking by.

Here’s the sort of serendipitous scene that reminds me to carry a camera. I fired the X100s from the hip while walking by. I love the fact that I can carry this lightweight, large sensor camera around my neck.

In the late afternoon, I stepped into the backyard with the D7100 and 105 f/2.8 Micro-Nikkor to see what I could see. What I saw were interesting colors...

In the late afternoon, I stepped into the backyard with the D7100 and 105 f/2.8 Micro-Nikkor to see what I could see. What I saw were interesting colors. This is surely one of my favorite lenses, and delivers beautiful results on both camera bodies.

The Dancers. Nikon D7100, 105 f/2.8 Micro.

The Dancers. Nikon D7100, 105 f/2.8 Micro.

John had read an article about how the metrosexual was not being replaced by the "Lumbersexual," and as he was working with a chainsaw in our front yard, he decided a photo was in order. The sun had gone down, so I grabbed the D610 and 85mm f/1.4. Even using the built-in flash with this backlit scene, the foreground was dark, but with lots of recovery latitude.

My son read an article about how the metrosexual was being supplanted by the “Lumbersexual,” and as he was working with a chainsaw in our front yard, he decided a photo was in order. The sun had gone down, so I grabbed the D610 and 85mm f/1.4. Even using the built-in flash with this backlit scene, the foreground was dark, but with lots of recovery latitude. All hail big sensors!

A lot of angst goes into each camera or software decision for me, but every piece of new gear also gets me to play and experiment like I did as a youngster, and that stimulates learning. I’m also somewhat amazed at how different my images look when processed through Lightroom rather than Aperture, which I used for years. I’m still not sure if the look is better, but it is very, very different. Guess I’ll just have to play more to learn more.

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Filed under Camera Gear, Nature Photography

Different Camera, New Software, Less Blogging

A rare problem - the birds were TOO CLOSE on this particular day at Bolsa Chica.

A rare problem – the birds were TOO CLOSE on this particular day at Bolsa Chica.

I traded my remaining D7000 for a D7100. Now I have, in effect, two versions of the same camera: the D7100 and D610. Almost identical in operation, but one DX sensor and one FX sensor. With my collection of DX and FX lenses, it’s a very versatile combination.

I’m using the D7100 for wildlife, the D610 for events and portraiture, and the Fujifilm X100s for travel. So far, so good, but it’s obviously cutting into my blogging time. Hopefully I’ll have more to report on the 24 megapixel dynamic duo soon. One thing I’ll be writing about: The buffer on the D7100 really let me down during a pelican feeding frenzy at Bolsa Chica. I’d be tracking the birds toward the water and the shutter would slow and then stop just before they struck. Very frustrating.

At the same time, I switched from Aperture to Lightroom for post-processing. The learning curve is steep for a lazy, disorganized, impatient photographer, but so far I like the results.

A nice family moment at Bolsa Chica. Nikon D7100, Nikon 70-200 f/2.8, Nikon TC1.7

A nice family moment at Bolsa Chica. Nikon D7100, Nikon 70-200 f/2.8, Nikon TC17eII teleconverter.

I've been reluctant to use the teleconverter lately, because it degrades image quality, but coupled with the 24 megapixel D7100, it really extends my reach.

I’ve been reluctant to use the teleconverter lately, because it degrades image quality, but coupled with the 24 megapixel D7100, it really extends my reach. Nikon D7100, Nikon 70-200 f/2.8, Nikon TC-17eII teleconverter.

Here is a close-up from the image above. You can see the fishtail and its shadow. I could get used to all these pixels.

Here is a close-up from the image above. You can see the fishtail and its shadow. I could get used to all these pixels. Nikon D7100, Nikon 70-200 f/2.8, Nikon TC17eII teleconverter.

The D7100 is no worse than any camera I've owned for birds in flight, and might be the best. I'll need more practice, and look forward to getting it.

The D7100 is no worse than any camera I’ve owned for birds in flight, and might be the best. I’ll need more practice, and look forward to getting it. Nikon D7100, Nikon 70-200 f/2.8, Nikon TC17eII teleconverter.

On another note, I took a three-day weekend recently with just the X100s. Here's my shadow in Mt. Shasta, California...

On another note, I took a three-day weekend recently with just the X100s. Here’s my shadow in Mt. Shasta, California…

...and here's Mt. Shasta itself. Fujifilm X100s

…and here’s Mt. Shasta itself. Fujifilm X100s

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Filed under Camera Gear, Nature Photography, Travel and Vacation

Conspicuous Composition: Favorites and Challenges from The Year of Square

Most Year of Square images were last-minute, grudging snapshots, but I still tried to make the composition matter.

Most Year of Square images were last-minute, grudging snapshots, but I still tried to make the composition matter.

I have been told there are no right angles in nature, but I don’t believe it. Nature’s basic operating principle is infinite diversity. I’m sure there are right angles out there somewhere.

Still, you’d have to scan the countryside pretty intently to come up with a rectangle that wasn’t man-made. Good luck finding a perfect square in a field of flowers. This, I think, was the biggest lesson of my Year of Square photo-a-day project: a square is an unnatural shape that calls attention to itself.

Hasselblad shooters and others created iconic square images, but we are accustomed to seeing photographs presented as rectangles. I found the square format challenging. All the usual “rules” of composition apply, but under tighter constraints. Three-plus weeks into the project, I produced an image that interested me:

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Filed under Camera Gear, Composition, Motivation

The Last Month of The Year of Square

As the Year of Square draws to a close, I must reflect on what I've learned about photography, and what it means that I take so many pictures in bars.

As the Year of Square draws to a close, I must reflect on what I’ve learned about photography, and what it means that I take so many pictures in bars.

This is the final month of the Year of Square. Thank goodness. Soon I’ll review the 360-ish images and figure out what I’ve learned. I fear it will have something to do with not being good at long-term self-assignments… Z

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Filed under Composition