First Orbis Experiment

The Orbis ring light adapter swallows an SB800 flash and spits out soft, even light.

The Orbis ring light adapter swallows an SB800 flash and spits out soft, even light. Your lens goes in the bagel breach (New York equivalent of a doughnut hole), so the light is on-axis and comes from all around.

Okay, experiment is a generous word for what I did, because “experiment” connotes careful documentation of processes, whereas I just tried some different things and then couldn’t tell which was which by the time I got the images onto a computer.

But it still worked out pretty dang well.

I’d read about the Orbis ring light device before, over at Strobist, so when one became available at a significant discount, I snapped it up.

I tried it on a couple of hasty macro shots, and marveled at its potential.

The ringlight will become very useful for macro photography if I ever calm down and use a freakin' tripod.

The ringlight will become very useful for macro photography if I ever calm down and use a freakin’ tripod.

But I like to photograph people (which is ironic, considering how effectively I avoid contact with other people), so I asked author Jennifer Brown to help me test three basic uses of the Orbis: 1) as fill light in a multi-light setup, 2) as key light on lens, and 3) as “soft box” off lens. First, let’s look at my extravagant studio space:

Fancy schmancy. That's a Photek Softlighter II at left, powered by a Nikon SB600. Standard black muslin backdrop, the Orbis unit on the table, and barely visible at right, an SB600 fitted with a blue filter and a grid.

Fancy schmancy. That’s a Photek Softlighter II at left, powered by a Nikon SB600. Standard black muslin backdrop, the Orbis unit on the table, and barely visible at right, an SB600 fitted with a blue filter and a grid. Gaffer’s tape, like wine, holds everything together.

You cannot see the gel behind the grid, but this is the SB600 I used as an accent light on the background. Aimed at the background, it produces the blue light behind Jennifer in the final images below.

You cannot see the gel behind the grid, but this is the SB600 I used as an accent light. Aimed at the background, it produces the blue light behind Jennifer in the final images below.

Here is a shot with the Orbis as fill, and I believe I should have turned it down, because it either overwhelms or blends with the Softlighter II at camera left. I like the catchlights, and I see great potential for this device as on-axis fill in a multi-flash scenario. Also, I dig the accent light.

Here is a multi-flash shot with the Orbis as fill, but I should have turned its power down, because it either overwhelms or blends with the Softlighter II at camera left. I like the catchlights, and I see great potential for this device as on-axis fill in a multi-flash scenario. Also, I dig the accent light. But I wanted to test my ability to create short-lighting using the Orbis as fill, and failed to do so here. As the old saying goes, we never have time to do it right, but we always have time to do it over…

Here we have only the Orbis (wrapped around the lens) and the accent light. This image is very encouraging, because it looks like I can use the ring flash for quick, softly lit head shots.

Here we have only the Orbis (wrapped around the lens) and the accent light. This image is very encouraging, because it looks like I can use the ring flash alone for quick, softly lit head shots.

Now this is interesting. In a feat that pushed my lack of manual dexterity to its limit, I held the flash/Orbis above and to the left of the camera. Using the rear focus button on a D610 while holding the camera in portrait orientation with one hand was truly an expensive accident waiting to happen, but we got a couple of shots before I was shaking too much to continue. Note that the Orbis has become an off-axis soft box, producing shadows that add depth to the image. Very encouraging, but I've got to work on my upper body strength (or break down and start using a tripod).

Now this is interesting. In a feat that pushed my lack of manual dexterity to its limit, I held the flash/Orbis above and to the left of the camera. Using the rear focus button on a D610 while holding the camera in portrait orientation with one hand was truly an expensive accident waiting to happen, but we got a couple of shots before I was shaking too much to continue. Note that the Orbis has become an off-axis soft box, producing semi-soft shadows that add depth to the image. Very encouraging, but I’ve got to work on my upper body strength (or break down and start using a tripod).

Jennifer and I conducted this test in about fifteen minutes so I could get a basic understanding of the Orbis unit, and I’m very excited about incorporating this into my work. Most of all, I’m eager to get the unit out on location where I’ll have to adapt to light I cannot control.

Leave a comment

Filed under Camera Gear, Lighting, Portraiture

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s